Cheap Chinese Labor, Anyone?

Businesses are booming on a global scale. Even with traditional business, you can sell your goods or offer your services to virtually everyone on the World Wide Web. The growing capitalist economy did an excellent job in conditioning the minds of the people to desire more material things in their lives, which drives the economy even further. While traditional economic principles explain the law of supply and demand, the new breed of entrepreneurs totally changed the landscape by creating demand for things and services that used to be not a necessity in people’s lives.

So, you get big markets for almost everything under the sun: towels and bedding, furniture and appliances, heck, even water pipes and bongs. Meanwhile, the advent of technology brings about a wave of tech gadgets for your every need. The most recent favorite are smart gadgets that not only look sleek and fancy but can do multiple things all at once using just one gadget. They also serve as portals to the web. You no longer need bulky computers or laptops to access the World Wide Web. And with this newfound freedom comes a new …

Is Chinese Labor As Bad As It Seems?

We’ve all heard stories about cheap Chinese labor that aren’t always pleasant to the ears. Almost everything sold globally is made in China. China has one of the cheapest labor/ manpower in the market, which is why multinational companies prefer doing business in this part of the globe because they get to save lots of money in the process. But how well do we really know about what’s going on in many of these Chinese factories? Don’t workers get paid right and do they really work under extreme and often unsafe working conditions?

Wherever you are in the world, it is hard to compete with Chinese labor and companies know that. Name any popular brand you know and they likely have an offshore office or factory in China to help them meet production demands. For the average Chinese person, these factories provide opportunities for them to earn some money to provide for their own families, obtain basic rights and send their kids to school. And no matter how difficult working conditions are, most Chinese don’t complain about it and just do their jobs to the best that they can.

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